Tag Archives: City

At Home in the City – Creating Community – Child Daycare Centers

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City Makes Good On Threat, 23 Yeshivas And Daycares Received Notices Of Violations

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sequoia with his lego city fire helicopter – MG 1745.JPG

Some cool daycare images:

sequoia with his lego city fire helicopter – MG 1745.JPG
daycare
Image by sean dreilinger
sequoia was home from preschool today and asked for help building this LEGO City Fire Helicopter. he is able to read the numbered pictorial instructions and insisted on doing most of it himself.

copyright © 2010 sean dreilinger

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view sequoia with his lego city fire helicopter – MG 1745 JPG on a black background.

Suara Indonesia Dance Preschool and Daycare Incursion
daycare
Image by jessdunnthis

the view of Old City Hall.

Check out these daycare images:

the view of Old City Hall.
daycare
Image by tess_marie
A picnic at Capitol Square on the day before the first day of daycare.

Twiners
daycare
Image by jumping lab
Jake and Chico

20th Anniversary- Oklahoma City Bombing-150419

Some cool daycares near me images:

20th Anniversary- Oklahoma City Bombing-150419
daycares near me
Image by usacetulsa
Click here to learn more about the Tulsa District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

20 years later: Tulsa District engineers recall Oklahoma City Bombing, response

Story and photo by Brannen Parrish

Following the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, April 19, 1995, the Tulsa District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dispatched three structural engineers to monitor the site.

Mark McVay and two other civil engineers arrived the next day. The District sent a fourth structural engineer, Mark Burkholder, a couple of weeks later, to monitor the site so demolitions experts could implode the remaining structure.

The bomb that destroyed the building detonated just 15 feet from the building and caused the deaths of 168 people.

“After the blast, a lot of Good Samaritans rushed in to help,” said Mark McVay. “One of the people who responded was a nurse. She just arrived at the site and was trying to help victims when a piece of debris fell and hit her on the head.”

The nurse, Rebecca Anderson, went to the site after seeing news reports on television. She died in the hospital four days later. Though rescue workers sustained numerous injuries searching for and assisting survivors, she was the only one killed.

“The roof of the Murrah Building was made from a mixture of light concrete and insulation, and it just crumbled in the explosion,” McVay said. “There were large chunks of debris hanging from the skeleton of the building that could crush a car if they fell.”

The civil engineers used a transit, a surveying tool used to measure angles, and a telescope to watch for falling debris. They also advised rescue workers as they attempted to remove rubble during the search for survivors.

“We would go into an area and assess the structure and tell them, whether they could move a piece without endangering a survivor,” said McVay. “There were a lot of long days. I remember being exhausted.”

Burkholder was sent in as the building was being prepped it for demolition.

“The demolition experts were drilling holes to weaken the remaining structure and to place the charges,” Burkholder said. “They were concerned that as they weakened it, a slab might fall down. There are critical spots on the building that you don’t want to move and we checked them regularly.”

The engineers set up their transit under an American elm tree in what used to be a parking lot between the Murrah Building and the Journal Record Building. The explosion sent glass and shrapnel into the tree’s trunk and branches, and even destroyed some of the branches. Though the explosion ripped away a portion of the Journal Record Building’s roof, the elm remained.

“At that time it was just a tree,” said Burkholder. “But a lot of people in casual conversation were asking, ‘How did that tree survive?’”

The Survivor Tree has thrived in the years following the bombing. Though it represented a curious improbability at the time, today it is a symbol of a community’s resilience.

“You have to realize that businesses in the area were so damaged they just closed down. I had to go five blocks to buy a sandwich and the sandwich shop that was open had damage. I thought the entire area around the site would be demolished,” said McVay. “I never realized that tree would become a symbol for the survivors or the city, even though we were all commenting, ‘that’s one tough tree.’”

McVay and Burkholder both agreed that they were most affected by the destruction of the daycare located on the second floor of the building, and just above the blast zone.

“It was the saddest thing I’d ever seen in my life,” said McVay. “It hit you in the gut when you see little kids’ toys scattered amongst the debris.”

Burkholder said he visited the site 10 years ago on a field trip with one of his children.

“When I first went back it kind of weighed on my mind,” he said. “It was tough. I can’t imagine the people who were doing the search and rescue operations.”

McVay said he is considering whether he will visit on the 20th anniversary.

“No, I haven’t been back. I can’t say that I haven’t had the chance, I just haven’t gone back,” he said. “I’d like to go sometime. I hadn’t planned on going on the anniversary but now that you mention it.”

The other structural engineers from the Tulsa District have moved on to other assignments. Lori Thomas now works at the Galveston District and John VanLeeuwen now works for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Click here to learn more about the Tulsa District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

“School picture” from daycare, 6 months old
daycares near me
Image by The Amber Joy
And the best-dressed baby there that day, if I do say so myself!

Hairbows & Smiles
daycares near me
Image by super-structure
Ainsley on the way to "work" (i.e., daycare).

20th Anniversary – Oklahoma City Bombing 150419

Some cool daycares near me images:

20th Anniversary – Oklahoma City Bombing 150419
daycares near me
Image by usacetulsa
Click here to learn more about the Tulsa District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

20 years later: Tulsa District engineers recall Oklahoma City Bombing, response

Story and photo by Brannen Parrish

Following the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, April 19, 1995, the Tulsa District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dispatched three structural engineers to monitor the site.

Mark McVay and two other civil engineers arrived the next day. The District sent a fourth structural engineer, Mark Burkholder, a couple of weeks later, to monitor the site so demolitions experts could implode the remaining structure.

The bomb that destroyed the building detonated just 15 feet from the building and caused the deaths of 168 people.

“After the blast, a lot of Good Samaritans rushed in to help,” said Mark McVay. “One of the people who responded was a nurse. She just arrived at the site and was trying to help victims when a piece of debris fell and hit her on the head.”

The nurse, Rebecca Anderson, went to the site after seeing news reports on television. She died in the hospital four days later. Though rescue workers sustained numerous injuries searching for and assisting survivors, she was the only one killed.

“The roof of the Murrah Building was made from a mixture of light concrete and insulation, and it just crumbled in the explosion,” McVay said. “There were large chunks of debris hanging from the skeleton of the building that could crush a car if they fell.”

The civil engineers used a transit, a surveying tool used to measure angles, and a telescope to watch for falling debris. They also advised rescue workers as they attempted to remove rubble during the search for survivors.

“We would go into an area and assess the structure and tell them, whether they could move a piece without endangering a survivor,” said McVay. “There were a lot of long days. I remember being exhausted.”

Burkholder was sent in as the building was being prepped it for demolition.

“The demolition experts were drilling holes to weaken the remaining structure and to place the charges,” Burkholder said. “They were concerned that as they weakened it, a slab might fall down. There are critical spots on the building that you don’t want to move and we checked them regularly.”

The engineers set up their transit under an American elm tree in what used to be a parking lot between the Murrah Building and the Journal Record Building. The explosion sent glass and shrapnel into the tree’s trunk and branches, and even destroyed some of the branches. Though the explosion ripped away a portion of the Journal Record Building’s roof, the elm remained.

“At that time it was just a tree,” said Burkholder. “But a lot of people in casual conversation were asking, ‘How did that tree survive?’”

The Survivor Tree has thrived in the years following the bombing. Though it represented a curious improbability at the time, today it is a symbol of a community’s resilience.

“You have to realize that businesses in the area were so damaged they just closed down. I had to go five blocks to buy a sandwich and the sandwich shop that was open had damage. I thought the entire area around the site would be demolished,” said McVay. “I never realized that tree would become a symbol for the survivors or the city, even though we were all commenting, ‘that’s one tough tree.’”

McVay and Burkholder both agreed that they were most affected by the destruction of the daycare located on the second floor of the building, and just above the blast zone.

“It was the saddest thing I’d ever seen in my life,” said McVay. “It hit you in the gut when you see little kids’ toys scattered amongst the debris.”

Burkholder said he visited the site 10 years ago on a field trip with one of his children.

“When I first went back it kind of weighed on my mind,” he said. “It was tough. I can’t imagine the people who were doing the search and rescue operations.”

McVay said he is considering whether he will visit on the 20th anniversary.

“No, I haven’t been back. I can’t say that I haven’t had the chance, I just haven’t gone back,” he said. “I’d like to go sometime. I hadn’t planned on going on the anniversary but now that you mention it.”

The other structural engineers from the Tulsa District have moved on to other assignments. Lori Thomas now works at the Galveston District and John VanLeeuwen now works for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Click here to learn more about the Tulsa District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Stage Door Dance | Sarasota Dance Lessons
daycares near me
Image by Sarasota Dance Studios
Sarasota dance lessons for kids – Stage Door Studios!

Leapfrog Academy | Day Care Union City GA | Daycare Centers College Park GA

Leapfrog Academy | Day Care Union City GA | Daycare Centers College Park GA

http://www.leapfrog-usa.com/ELA/
Call Now To Enroll – (770) 306-8181

Early Learning Academy
(Ages 6 weeks to 6 years old)
Integrity
We at Leapfrog Academy of Excellence believe integrity should be the foundation of all education, both as it is implemented to our students and as it is ingrained in our teaching method. Knowing the problem is fifty percent of the solution, hence, we pride ourselves in always being upfront and honest with our parents about their child’s progress and development. This will always lead to the quickest and most effective path towards success.

Commitment
“The relentless pursuit of excellence…each and every day” is more than a motto that simply sounds nice. We truly live by it at Leapfrog. Our goal is focused: To give your child the best supplemental education possible within a caring and safe environment. Our management team and teachers are fully committed to continuously explore innovative and effective teaching methods that will assist your child in getting test scores up.

Responsibility
Along with helping your child turn C’s and B’s into A’s , Leapfrog Academy of Excellence also recognizes that it has a social responsibility. Local businesses and community leaders have a civic duty to promote growth and change in south Fulton. The vehicle for change always comes from a fulfilled education in our public school system, which must be supplemented by uniting our local talented business leaders and motivated mentors with our community’s children. We all have a responsibility towards change, and Leapfrog will never shy away from leading the way by making the connections.
Video Rating: / 5

Here is our updated daycare set-up. I have been doing in home child care for 6 years.. not sure why I said 8? 🙂 I did work in child care centers before doing in home care.

Here is the link to my to

City of Surrey employees give back through Day of Caring

A few nice daycare costs images I found:

City of Surrey employees give back through Day of Caring
daycare costs
Image by United Way of the Lower Mainland
On Monday May 31, 2010, a group of City of Surrey employees gave their all back into the community as they have done annually for The Vancouver Sun United Way Day of Caring.

This year they planted a vegetable garden for the South Fraser Women’s Services Society. SFWSS partners with the community to provide resources, programs and support to improve the lives of women and their families.

The garden that the city volunteers planted, will be able to provide women with fresh vegetables and help offset the cost to their Hot lunch Program.

Later in the week a new batch of city volunteers moves into another neighbourhood in their Surrey community: Oak Avenue Neighbourhood Hub Society.

There the city employees will be cleaning a daycare playground, preparing it for the summer, refilling the bark mulch, and putting down landscape fabric.

Hats off to this dedicated team of city hall employees, librarians, firefighters, engineers, parks and rec folks. They are not afraid to get their hands dirty in order to help their neighbours.

The Vancouver Sun United Way Day of Caring is a unique opportunity for employees in the workplace to come together, develop team-building skills and make a difference in our community by taking part in one-day work projects at Metro Vancouver not-for-profit social service agencies.

www.uwlm.ca/default.htm

City of Surrey employees give back through Day of Caring
daycare costs
Image by United Way of the Lower Mainland
On Monday May 31, 2010, a group of City of Surrey employees gave their all back into the community as they have done annually for The Vancouver Sun United Way Day of Caring.

This year they planted a vegetable garden for the South Fraser Women’s Services Society. SFWSS partners with the community to provide resources, programs and support to improve the lives of women and their families.

The garden that the city volunteers planted, will be able to provide women with fresh vegetables and help offset the cost to their Hot lunch Program.

Later in the week a new batch of city volunteers moves into another neighbourhood in their Surrey community: Oak Avenue Neighbourhood Hub Society.

There the city employees will be cleaning a daycare playground, preparing it for the summer, refilling the bark mulch, and putting down landscape fabric.

Hats off to this dedicated team of city hall employees, librarians, firefighters, engineers, parks and rec folks. They are not afraid to get their hands dirty in order to help their neighbours.

The Vancouver Sun United Way Day of Caring is a unique opportunity for employees in the workplace to come together, develop team-building skills and make a difference in our community by taking part in one-day work projects at Metro Vancouver not-for-profit social service agencies.

www.uwlm.ca/default.htm